Noticeboard

Read a letter explaining our role during the COVID-19 pandemic here.

Flu Clinics

We are offering additional flu clinics on Monday 23rd and Saturday 28th November.

Click here for more information

Zero Tolerance Policy

A number of our staff have recently experienced foul and abusive language or behaviour from a minority of patients. This is not acceptable and we will not tolerate this sort of behaviour towards our staff – all of whom continue to work tirelessly during this pandemic. In line with our zero tolerance policy, if you are found to be abusive towards members of staff then appropriate action will be taken

Please be aware that it is not a GP’s responsibility to issue school letters of absence for your children, regarding COVID-19 or other illness. Government guidance is that school attendance is mandatory unless your child is self-isolating, has symptoms of COVID-19, is close to someone who has COVID-19 or has received a letter advising them to shield.

Emergencies

What is an emergency?

When it comes to your health or the health of someone in your family, it is often very obvious if the person is seriously ill and needs immediate emergency care. An emergency is a critical or life-threatening situation.

To help you decide what a critical situation is; here are some examples:

  • unconsciousness;
  • a suspected stroke;
  • heavy blood loss;
  • suspected broken bones;
  • a deep wound such as a stab wound;
  • a suspected heart attack;
  • difficulty in breathing;
  • severe burns;
  • a severe allergic reaction.

There are a few things that you should remember in any emergency. These will help you to deal with the situation quickly and efficiently:

  • Stay calm, shout for help. You may need to instruct someone to telephone 999. Make sure they know where the ambulance has to come to, and they have some details about the person who is injured or ill;
  • Don't put yourself in danger. For example, if someone has been electrocuted, make sure you switch off the power supply before touching them;
  • Do everything you can to help the person;
  • Don't give the person anything to eat, drink or smoke;
  • Don't stick anything in their mouth;
  • Follow the instructions the ambulance service call handler may give you.

Lancaster University Students

Anyone living on the Lancaster university campus needing an ambulance should dial 999 on the internal telephone system rather than using a mobile. The call is channelled through security who can meet the ambulance and quickly direct it to the scene. In term time Security will also ask a Nurse to attend until the ambulance arrives. However if you are not near an internal telephone do not delay. Make a call by any means available. After the call contact security on 01524 594541 to let them know you are expecting an ambulance.

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website